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Article
September 14, 1907

THE LARYNX IN LOCOMOTOR ATAXIA.

Author Affiliations

Associate in Otology at the Philadelphia Polyclinic and School for Graduates in Medicine; Instructor in Laryngology, University of Pennsylvania. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1907;XLIX(11):924-926. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25320110036001h
Abstract

About five years ago, at the suggestion of Dr. Charles W. Burr, I examined the larynges of patients with tabes dorsalis at the Philadelphia Home for Incurables. Later I examined all the cases of that disease under Dr. Burr's care at the Philadelphia General Hospital, and also the cases then under the care of Drs. Spiller and Weisenburg at that hospital, these gentlemen having kindly placed their patients at my disposal for the purpose. This report of the examination in these cases may be considered a negative one, for practically nothing of great interest was discovered, but it seems worth while to bring up the subject for discussion because, in the text-books and elsewhere, one is led to believe that laryngeal trouble is rather frequently found in locomotor ataxia.

Of the cases at the Home for Incurables examination was possible in four, and the results are given in detail.

Case 

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