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Article
December 23, 1893

MEDICAL EDUCATION.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF THE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE, RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE, CHICAGO, ILL.

JAMA. 1893;XXI(26):959-960. doi:10.1001/jama.1893.02420780007001b

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Abstract

The present is a time of evolution and change in the methods of medical education. The country has outgrown the old system which was the best that could be provided for the hungry boys who could hardly keep soul and body together during a term of sixteen weeks of exclusion from the maternal pantry. Thus far the progress that has been made is in the way of real improvement. It might have been much more rapidly effected had the pecuniary endowments of medical education been established upon broader foundation; but, taking everything into consideration, the teachers of medicine throughout the country have accomplished all that with their limited resources was possible. We have reached the point where eight or nine months'sessions are required at the leading medical schools, and four years of study are requisite for graduation. The next step in advance will consist in the enforcement of attendance upon

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