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Article
November 17, 1917

THE ALLEGED FORMATION OF CONNECTIVE TISSUE FIBERS FROM FIBRIN

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(20):1696-1697. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590470036011
Abstract

In the progress of scientific theories it is not uncommon to find opinion swinging alternately back and forth between two seemingly conflicting views, until a sufficient accumulation of facts finally permits an incontrovertible judgment to be formed. Something of this sort seems to be going on in relation to a debated feature of wound healing. The generally prevailing view, as was pointed out some time ago in The Journal,1 has been that the fibrin, in wounds healing by first intention, forms a temporary tissue which holds the wound surfaces in place and stops up the wound, thus preventing infection. Later the fibrin disappears, not by liquefaction, but through an actual consumption by the new tissue cells, which show a positive chemotropism to the fibrin mass and are thus attracted into the fibrin clot in large numbers. The permanent tissues that go to fill the wound space are then formed

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