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Article
October 5, 1907

THE PHYSIOLOGY OF THE THYROID GLAND IN ITS RELATION TO EXOPHTHALMIC GOITER.

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK CITY.

From the Loomis Laboratory, Department of Experimental Pathology of Cornell University Medical College.

JAMA. 1907;XLIX(14):1155-1158. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25320140001001
Abstract

The investigations of the last twenty years have given to the thyroid gland a physiologic importance of the first order. So enthusiastic have some observers become in their belief in its primal position in physiology and also, on the part of a few, in therapeutics, that one is almost tempted to compare its supposed potency to the famed fountain of eternal youth whose magic healing and rejuvenating properties was the hope of the aged, infirm explorer. I must confess myself as among those who share the belief that the thyroid is a true gland, whose proper functioning plays such a part in the physiologic rhythm of the body that it stands very near to, if, indeed, not in, the list of viscera to which the term vital is properly applied. I share also in the belief that the thyroid proteids have a wide range of beneficial therapeutic activity, and yet

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