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Article
February 10, 1894

ACUTE INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION—ANASTOMOSIS WITH MURPHY'S BUTTON—RECOVERY.

Author Affiliations

CLINICAL LECTURER ON GYNECOLOGY KANSAS CITY MEDICAL COLLEGE; MEMBER AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF OBSTETRICIANS AND GYNECOLOGISTS, ETC. KANSAS CITY, MO.

JAMA. 1894;XXII(6):188-189. doi:10.1001/jama.1894.02420850016002f

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Abstract

Henry Binford, Nashville, Tenn., age 22. Some two years ago this young man had an attack of peritonitis, the origin of which, from his vague history, I am unable to obtain. Since that time he has had to be very careful with his diet, lest he bring on an attack of "colic." He has a slight "pulmonary trouble," leading to a suspicion of a tubercular peritonitis origin. On November 5, 1893, while on the street, he was taken with a severe pain in the region of the umbilicus, the intensity of which caused him to consult Dr. Chas. Lester of this city, who prescribed the usual antispasmodics and anodynes to relieve an intestinal colic, due to indigestion, and directed him to go to bed. The pain continued with unabated severity, and the doctor was called to see him, and prescribed salines to rid the bowel of the offending agent causing

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