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December 8, 1917

WOUND INFECTION AMONG LATHE WORKERSAN INVESTIGATION INTO SOME OF THE FACTORS CAUSING WOUND INFECTION IN INDUSTRIAL SURGERY AND METHODS OF OBVIATING THEM

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND

From the Laboratories of the Department of Hygiene and Bacteriology, Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(23):1927-1930. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590500009002
Abstract

While serving in the emergency hospital of a large manufacturing plant last summer, I was impressed by the great number of infections and cases of furunculosis with which we had to deal. On some men a pinprick, if left unattended, developed into a severe lymphangitis; a slight scratch in twelve hours into a linear mass of pus; a slight abrasion into a suppurating ulcer, and a laceration into a mass of necrotic tissue and pus. There were dozens of cases of multiple furunculosis, some patients developing as many as fifty boils at once on their arms and legs and faces. It is probable that ours was not the only manufacturing plant troubled with experience of this sort, since out of the total amount paid for deaths by the Industrial Commission of Ohio last year, 22 per cent. was for those resulting from infections, and of the total amount paid for

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