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Article
December 8, 1917

PREMATURE DETACHMENT OF PLACENTA, WITH DELIVERY OF A LIVE BABY BY CESAREAN SECTION

Author Affiliations

Chicago Attending Obstetrician, Cook County and Provident Hospitals; Assistant Obstetrician, Chicago Lying-In Hospital; Instructor of Obstetrics, Northwestern University Medical School

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(23):1969-1970. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590500051014

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Abstract

Mrs. S. G., aged 35, primipara, was in the ninth month of pregnancy. For the past thirty days there had been a small amount of albumin with no casts in the urine. The maximum blood pressure was 120. May 12, the patient was struck in the abdomen by the head of a 3-year-old child, who threw himself in her lap. This caused considerable pain at the time, but was soon forgotten by the patient. May 16, four days later, the patient walked seven blocks; when near her house she was taken with moderately severe pain in the lower abdomen and back, which was continuous, not intermittent. One hour later, fresh blood was discharged from the vagina, in small quantities but continuously. The patient thought that she lost about 4 ounces of blood during the first hour or two. At 3 p. m. (three hours after the pain had started), examination

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