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Article
December 15, 1917

THE USE OF BISMUTH IODOFORM PASTE IN OUTPATIENT WORK

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Surgical Outpatient Department, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital.

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(24):2010-2011. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590510002002
Abstract

The treatment of postoperative hospital cases, as well as that of minor surgical conditions, comprises the general function of the routine work in the outpatient departments of our larger hospitals.

The chronically obstinate sinuses of osteomyelitis, tuberculosis, fecal fistula, empyema, lung abscess cavities and innumerable similar conditions present problems of no small importance to the outpatient surgeon who must receive the convalescent patient on his discharge from the hospital ward and take over the problem of promoting a rapid and complete recovery.

Another difficulty with which the outpatient surgeon has to deal is the indifference and the neglect of the patient to return regularly for treatment.

It was the hope of obtaining better results than with the means commonly employed that led us to use bismuth iodoform paste, first described and used by Rutherford Morison1 in the treatment of war wounds at the Northumberland War Hospital, England.

In our

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