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Article
March 3, 1894

WHY GENERAL PRACTITIONERS SEND CASES TO THE HOSPITAL.

Author Affiliations

MARIENVILLE, PA.

JAMA. 1894;XXII(9):298-299. doi:10.1001/jama.1894.02420880014001c

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Abstract

I have adopted the above title simply because I could find no other for this brief paper, and yet it does not express all I want to get at. In an excellent article in the Journal of January 27, Dr. Keister says that, "in nine cases out of ten, it is sheer stinginess on the part of the physician, that he is not properly equipped with instruments. This poin t, and one other, are the only exceptions—that I see— to take to that practical paper. The "one other" is this: "Conservative surgery is yielding better results every day, and I believe the time is not far distant, when women's ovaries will be let as severely alone by the abdominal surgeon as the Holy Bible." All I want to suggest on that point is that perhaps if "the abdominal surgeon did not let the Holy Bible," so "severely alone," he might

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