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Article
December 22, 1917

THE USE OF CALCIUM CHLORID TO PRESERVE MOISTURE IN ANATOMIC SPECIMENS AND CADAVERS

Author Affiliations

Washington, D. C. Assistant Professor of Anatomy, Georgetown University School of Medicine

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(25):2107. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.25910520006011h

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Abstract

On account of the high price of glycerin, we began to experiment, about a year ago in the laboratories of Georgetown University School of Medicine, to obtain if possible some other substance to keep anatomic specimens moist. As a result, we have adopted for this purpose purified calcium chlorid.

Brain specimens were first hardened in a 5 to 10 per cent. solution of formaldehyd, for about two months, and then transferred to the saturated solution of calcium chlorid, in which they remained for one week. They were then placed on ordinary dissecting room trays, without any cover, except another tray inverted to keep out the dust, but in no solution whatsoever and without even a damp cloth covering to retain moisture.

These specimens have now been kept in this manner for periods ranging from one to nine months, at ordinary room temperature and during the hot months of a Washington

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