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Article
September 26, 1885

THE SURGICAL TREATMENT OF CYSTS OF THE PANCREAS.

Author Affiliations

OF MILWAUKEE, WIS.

JAMA. 1885;V(13):337-344. doi:10.1001/jama.1885.02391120001001
Abstract

TOPOGRAPHICAL ANATOMY.

For a correct interpretation of the signs and symptoms toms of cysts of the pancreas, and for an accurate understanding of the relations of this organ to surrounding parts in their surgical treatment, it becomes necessary to allude briefly to the topographical anatomy of the pancreas. The pancreas is a tongueshaped gland placed transversely in the abdomen, at a point opposite the first lumbar vertebra behind the stomach, reaching from the hilus of the spleen to the concavity of the duodenum. Its right end, termed the head, is embraced by the curvature of the duodenum, whilst its left or caudal extremity is in contact with the spleen. After opening the abdominal cavity in cadavers, it can be distinctly felt as a firm body through the walls of the stomach. The organ is made accessible and exposed to sight by cutting the ligamentum gastro-colicum transversely, and by pushing the

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