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December 5, 1885

THE CONTAGIOUSNESS OF LEPROSY.

JAMA. 1885;V(23):630-631. doi:10.1001/jama.1885.02391220014004

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Abstract

At the meeting of the Académie de Médecine, of Paris, on July 28, M. Constantin Paul read a report on a study of the lepers of Constantinople, by Dr. Zambaco. In this report he attempts to show that leprosy is not contagious; he does not admit that a healthy person can contract the disease from a leper, even by inoculation, and this conclusion has been reached after a thorough study of the disease in Norway, Egypt and Constantinople. And while he cannot admit the influence of contagion, he thoroughly endorses the views as to the hereditary origin of the disease,—views which are supported by the investigations of Boeck and Danielssen, and also by a study of the disease as it occurs in restricted localities, such as in Louisiana and New Brunswick, where it may be traced back in families for several generations, as in Norway.

At the meeting of the

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