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Article
June 10, 1911

DEFINITE KNOWLEDGE OBTAINED BY MEANS OF THE X-RAY

Author Affiliations

ROCK ISLAND, ILL.

JAMA. 1911;LVI(23):1700-1705. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.02560230002002
Abstract

While it is possible for an expert photographer so to alter x-ray negatives and prints that they may be made to represent almost anything, yet there can be no question about the x-ray's wide range of usefulness in solving the many perplexing problems with which the surgeon is continuously confronted.

An agent for one of our large z-ray houses recently said that certain physicians had told him that "the x-ray was a thing of the past and it would soon be done away with." Such conclusions can be due only to one of two causes: either these physicians have fumbled their own axray work or some one else has fumbled it for them.

Some one has well said: "To read the report of finding a renal calculus, a tuberculous hip or a frontal sinus disease is one thing; to realize the long road of failure and discouragement which the writer

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