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June 10, 1911

A DIRECTORY FOR WET-NURSES: ITS EXPERIENCES FOR TWELVE MONTHS

JAMA. 1911;LVI(23):1715-1717. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.02560230017008
Abstract

Most general practitioners and all men who deal especially with infants have had at one time or another occasion to find a wet-nurse for some sick baby. Often it has been a question of obtaining human milk within twenty-four hours to save the life of the baby. Anyone who has searched for a wet-nurse and has hunted hours and sometimes days without success, knows what a discouraging chase it has been; it has been doubly so when the emaciated baby was quickly slipping beyond all hope of recovery.

An attempt was made, about ten years ago, to register wet-nurses at the Boston Medical Library under the same system as an intelligence office and thus to centralize the demand and supply. This was a failure for several reasons: A mother who was forced to wet-nurse usually did so because she had not enough money to live on and, therefore, could not

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