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June 17, 1911

THE CULTIVATION OF TISSUES IN SALT SOLUTIONS

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Anatomical Laboratory. Johns Hopkins University.

JAMA. 1911;LVI(24):1795-1796. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.02560240025011
Abstract

The introduction by Harrison1 of the important method of the study of the growth of small pieces of living tissues of cold-blooded animals transplanted into lymph and the later extension of this method by Burrows and Carrel2 to warm-blooded animals by transplanting into plasma marks the beginning of a new epoch in experimental anatomy.

The result of the observations given below, that embryonic chick tissue will grow in various salt solutions, further broadens the field of work in that tissues can be studied in media all the constituents of which are known and the reaction of the cells to different substances can be more definitely determined.

After the cultivation of embryonic chick tissues in nutrient agar and bouillon media,3 it was found that such tissues would grow nearly as well in Locke's solution to which small amounts of certain of the polypeptids and amido-acids had been added.

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