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Article
May 19, 1894

INSANITY; SYMPTOMS AND TREATMENT.

Author Affiliations

P. A. SURGEON, RETIRED, U. S. NAVY.

JAMA. 1894;XXII(20):737-739. doi:10.1001/jama.1894.02420990011002a

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Abstract

Dr. Carpenter's "Principles of Human Physiology," tersely defines insanity to be "in its highest degree a complete disturbance of the intellectual faculties; the thoughts are not inactive, but rather far more active than in health; they are uncontrolled and wander from one subject to another with extraordinary rapidity; they twist and turn a single subject in every way; the faculties seem to have escaped from all restraint, thought after thought succeeding with such velocity that all power of perception is destroyed and the mind ceases to perceive impressions made upon the senses. The patient raves, unconscious of what occurs around him; he fancies that he hears voices, while ocular spectra excite further rhapsodies and a condition of delirium. The intellectual powers are disordered, depending upon structural disorder of the cerebrum. Disordered emotional excitement constitutes impulsive moral insanity or monomania, destructive in tendency and presenting examples, sometimes of homicide or suicide,

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