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Article
November 9, 1907

THE TREATMENT OF TRIFACIAL NEURALGIA BY MEANS OF DEEP INJECTIONS OF ALCOHOL.REPORT OF SIXTEEN CASES.

Author Affiliations

Clinical Professor of Nervous and Mental Diseases, Northwestern University Medical School; Professor of Nervous and Mental Diseases, Chicago Policlinic. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1907;XLIX(19):1567-1574. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25320190001001
Abstract

To dwell on the atrocious pain of trifacial neuralgia, tic douloureux, and emphasize the chronicity of the disease were a work of supererogation. To rehearse the uncertainties and failures of the several forms of medical treatment and detail the difficulties and dangers of the operation for radical cure were to repeat familiar history. This paper relates simply to my own clinical experience with the deep injection of alcohol.

In the spring of 1906 I had an opportunity to see some of the cases treated by Lévy and Baudouin at the Salpêtrière, and a few days later Dr. Lévy kindly demonstrated their method to me on a new patient. Their results were so gratifying and the operation itself apparently so simple that I resolved to give future patients the benefit of it and, indeed, began to make the injections a few days after my return.

I have adopted entire the method

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