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Article
November 9, 1907

CONTAGION AS A FACTOR IN THE SPREAD OF TYPHOID FEVER IN THE MILITARY SERVICE.

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1907;XLIX(19):1592-1593. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25320190026001f

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Abstract

The abstract of the report on the origin and spread of typhoid fever in the United States military camps during the Spanish War of 1898, by Majors Reed, Vaughan and Shakespeare showed conclusively that personal contact was a most important factor in the spread of typhoid fever in military camps.

The lesson of that experience was thoroughly taken to heart by the medical department of the army, and on request of the Surgeon General the attention of all officers and men was called to the importance of this method of infection and to the means of preventing it by the following circular:

[Circular No. 62.]

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

Adjutant General's Office,

Washington, Dec. 24, 1902.

By direction of the Secretary of War, the following memorandum, prepared by the Surgeon General of the Army, on the subject of typhoid fever contagion and the means of preventing it is published to

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