[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 4, 1903

THE TREATMENT OF SCARLET FEVER, ITS COMPLICATIONS AND SEQUELÆ.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Diseases of Children, College of Medicine, University of Nebraska: Physician to Child's Saving Institution and Methodist Hospital. OMAHA.

JAMA. 1903;XLI(1):31-34. doi:10.1001/jama.1903.04470030035008
Abstract

It is difficult to discuss intelligibly the treatment of a disease having such wide variations in its clinical manifestations. In speaking of the cases, I shall use the designations: malignant, mild, severe and septic. Malignant cases are those overwhelmed by the poison and terminating fatally in one or two days. I shall say nothing of the treatment of this class. Mild cases are those presenting the characteristic symptoms without complications, the fever subsiding in from five to seven days. Severe cases are those having high temperature, profuse rash, often nervous symptoms, erythematous sore throat, but without membranous exudate. Septic cases are those presenting the symptoms of scarlet fever and, in addition, membranous exudate on the tonsils and other portions of the throat. These cases may or may not be severe at the inception. This is the class of cases in which we have the streptococci infection. These clinical divisions are

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×