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Article
November 9, 1907

A CASE OF POISONING BY METALLIC NICKEL.

Author Affiliations

Formerly Professor of Physiology, Beaumont Hospital Medical College. ST. LOUIS.

JAMA. 1907;XLIX(19):1606-1607. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25320190040003

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Abstract

It is well known that a number of metals like zinc, lead, etc., when inhaled or swallowed with atmospheric dust may produce symptoms of poisoning, but of poisoning by metallic nickel I have found no record. The case I report was not observed so closely as might be desired, yet a number of facts have been recorded which may be of interest.

History.  —C. S., male, aged 24, of slender build, weighed 116 pounds (never over 119 pounds), height 5 feet 7 inches. Worked as a metal polisher, polishing aluminum, copper, brass, and mostly nickel. The process generates considerable dust, which is only partially removed by "sucking blowers" instituted for the protection of the workers. Gave a history of diphtheria and typhoid fever in childhood, otherwise healthy. Inclined to be constipated. Denied syphilis and other contagious diseases. In his work the patient was of cleanly habits, always washing his hands

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