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November 16, 1907

ALCOHOLIC INSANITIES.A STUDY OF FOUR HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SEVEN CASES.

Author Affiliations

Associate in Nervous and Mental Diseases, Jefferson Medical College; Examiner of the Insane at the Philadelphia Hospital, etc. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1907;XLIX(20):1650-1654. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25320200008002
Abstract

The subject of alcoholism is one of the most important. The pernicious influence that alcohol exercises on the individual's physical, intellectual and moral spheres of life shows that this poison presents a serious danger to society. Diametrically opposite views have been held as to the advisability of the use of a moderate amount of alcohol as a daily habit. The most recent researches of Reid Hunt1 throw considerable light on the physiologic side of the question and show in the most conclusive manner that even extremely moderate amounts of alcohol may cause distinct changes in certain physiologic functions and that under certain circumstances these changes may be injurious to the body; certain physiologic processes even in moderate drinkers are distinctly different from those in abstainers.

Alcohol has a special predilection for the nervous system. We will not be concerned here with the pathologic changes produced by the poison in

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