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Article
September 16, 1911

THE JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

JAMA. 1911;LVII(12):980-982. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.04260090202015
Abstract

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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1911

HEATING AND VENTILATION  It has long been the custom of hygienists to insist that ventilation or perflation of crowded rooms is necessary in order to remove poisonous emanations arising from the human body. More than twenty years ago, however, observations made to determine the nature of the alleged poisonous properties of the expired air and of "crowd poison" led to negative results. No toxic organic constituent could be demonstrated in the air of crowded rooms, and as for the carbon dioxid, it was so realtively slight in amount that it could not be held responsible for the physiological effects observed, and could at most be regarded as "a measure of danger." To what, then are due the disagreeable consequences of

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