September 16, 1911

Lehrbuch der Augenheilkunde in der Form klinischer Besprechungen.

JAMA. 1911;LVII(12):1004. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.04260090226029

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The student of ophthalmic science cannot complain nowadays of a paucity of either domestic or foreign text-books, compendiums, treatises and monogrphs on the eye and its diseases. While for Americans practicing in America the products of the domestic pen are far more likely to be of practical value than any foreign manual, however well writtn. the clearly expressed words of the professor of ophthalmology at Greiswald should not be forgotten when a German authority is to be consulted.

The familiar form which these teachings take—that of talks to a class—are at least pleasant reading and one soon feels that one is under the spell of a competent teacher, investigator and thinker. Römer is probably best known to us as an experimenter and investigator in the realms of applied therapeutics—easily the weakest side of German ophthalmology—and we are not disappointed, especially while reading the chapters on treatment, to find that Römer

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