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Article
August 4, 1894

A Modern Wizard.

JAMA. 1894;XXIII(5):207. doi:10.1001/jama.1894.02421100035010

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Abstract

This novel has for its heavy villain a Dr. Medjora, a very learned physician, who hypnotizes people at will. He kills his second wife with cultures of diphtheria bacilli, and by means of a poison which he has discovered—"sanatoxine"— he makes himself a raving maniac to escape the consequences of his crime. He has, however, in the meantime carefully educated his son in hypnotic and other lore, and is firmly of the opinion that the son will discover the antidote to "sanatoxine" and then restore him to his senses. The "sanatoxine" Dr. Medjora has carefully prepared from the cerebral insanity center. The story is cleverly told, and from a detective standpoint is effective, but on the whole leaves a bad impression.

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