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Article
July 25, 1903

BACILLARY DYSENTERY (SHIGA).

Author Affiliations

MAJOR AND SURGEON U. S. ARMY. FORT SAM HOUSTON, TEXAS.

JAMA. 1903;XLI(4):242-246. doi:10.1001/jama.1903.04480010028007
Abstract

GENERAL REMARKS.  Dysentery has been, from the earliest times, a disease of great importance, and especially has this been the case in the tropics and in the camps of great armies in the field. My own impression, gained from something over two years' service in the tropics, is that intestinal disorders far outnumber all other diseases, and that of these, dysentery is of overshadowing importance, both on account of its high rate of mortality, and because of the invaliding which results from it.In the medical history of the War of the Rebellion something over 259,000 cases of acute dysentery and 28,000 cases of the chronic type are reported to have occurred in the Federal Army alone; and, again, during the Spanish-American War the same disease played havoc among our troops in Cuba, Porto Rico and the Philippines; in the South African campaign it w widely prevalent..,g jjiIn the

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