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Article
August 25, 1894

RESTRICTION OF TUBERCULOSIS.Read in the Section on State Medicine, at the Forty-fifth Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association held at San Francisco, June 5-8, 1894.

Author Affiliations

MEMBER OF CALIFORNIA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH; MEMBER AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION, ETC.

JAMA. 1894;XXIII(8):298-300. doi:10.1001/jama.1894.02421130008001d

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Abstract

Tuberculosis is the great enemy of the human race, —one-seventh of the entire human family die of tuberculosis.—(Koch). But little progress had been made in prophylaxis or treatment until the discovery by Koch of the pathogenic germ, the bacillus tuberculosis, which he announced to the world in 1882.

The bacillus tuberculosis is "parasitic, aerobic, non-motile, and only grows at 37 degrees C."—(Sternberg); though certain bacteriologists of the French school say it thrives even better at 39 degrees C. The thermal death point of the bacillus tuberculosis is about 70 degrees C.—moist heat—but it was formerly believed to be much higher, even 100 degrees C. The unstained spaces in the preparations of the bacilli under the microscope are generally believed to be spores, but the question of sporulation remains unsettled as the non-resistance of the bacillus to chemical agents, and having such a low thermal death point, would not indicate the

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