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Article
September 8, 1894

SHOULD CASES OF TUBERCULAR CONSUMPTION BE REPORTED TO LOCAL BOARDS OF HEALTH?Read at the Meeting of the Northern Tri-State Medical Association, held at Angola, Ind., July 17, 1894.

Author Affiliations

MEMBER OF THE MICHIGAN STATE MEDICAL SOCIETY, NORTHERN TRI-STATE MEDICAL SOCIETY, AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, THE NINTH AND TENTH INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS. TECUMSEH, MICH.

JAMA. 1894;XXIII(10):387-389. doi:10.1001/jama.1894.02421150021001d

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Abstract

The question with the above heading should be stated somewhat after the following manner: Should a case of pulmonary tuberculosis be reported to the local board of health as a case of contagious disease?

It has been estimated by very competent men, that tubercular consumption carries off about one-seventh of the human race. When we take into consideration the great number of diseases that "flesh is heir to," this must be considered a very high death rate from a single disease.

The efforts put forth by the various governments of the civilized world to prevent the spread of Asiatic cholera are very great indeed, yet the death rate from cholera with all its ravages is never equal to the death rate of "the great white plague," pulmonary tuberculosis. The disease has invaded almost every part of the habitable world; it enters the palace of the prince, as well as the

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