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Article
August 01, 1903

ACUTE EPIPHYSITIS CAUSING A CONDITION SUBSEQUENTLY SIMULATING CONGENITAL HIP MISPLACEMENT.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Surgery Creighton Medical College; Attending Surgeon St. Joseph's Hospital. OMAHA.

JAMA. 1903;XLI(5):305-308. doi:10.1001/jama.1903.04480020013005
Abstract

The writer uses the word misplacement, instead of dislocation, agreeing with Tubby, who says that dislocation can not properly be applied to a condition where the bone never was in place; the word misplacement seems to be better suited to describe the congenital condition. Epiphysitis does, however, result in a dislocation, and the condition might therefore be properly called pathologic dislocation of the hip, resulting from epiphysitis.

May 12, 1902, a female child of 2 years was referred to me by Dr. McClanahan. It was delicate, but well nourished. Appearances indicated congenital misplacement of the right hip. Indeed, all the conditions were typical of this condition. The history, however, disclosed information which placed such a diagnosis In doubt. At 16 months, when the child had essayed to walk, she was normal, as far as the parents knew. At this time she suffered a severe attack of lobar pneumonia, from which

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