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Article
December 14, 1907

A CASE OF FATAL ANEMIA, SECONDARY TO PYELONEPHRITIS, IN AN INFANT OF ELEVEN MONTHS.

Author Affiliations

Instructor in Pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1907;XLIX(24):2004-2005. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25320240040003
Abstract

The following case illustrates the great importance of examining the urine of infants:

History.  —Agnes M., a white infant, 11 months old, was brought to the medical dispensary of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Sept. 13, 1907. The father was in good health and the mother was a well-nourished woman, but suffered from indigestion, and was of a nervous disposition. She had had ten children, nine of whom were living, and all were well except the patient. The baby, whose birth preceded the patient's, was born dead after a difficult instrumental delivery, due to some abnormal presentation. Two maternal aunts and one paternal uncle died of tuberculosis. The patient's birth was difficult, being a face presentation. The physician in attendance stated the baby weighed 12 pounds at birth, although he did not weigh the baby with scales. The patient since birth had been fed exclusively on the breast. The mother

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