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Article
August 01, 1903

THE INFLUENCE OF THE DWELLING IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS.

JAMA. 1903;XLI(5):316. doi:10.1001/jama.1903.04480020024010

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Abstract

While the rich are not immune, and do not escape its ravages, tuberculosis is, in a large measure, a disease of the poor, and this is so because with the rich there is generally intelligence and a knowledge of hygienic measures and the means to provide them, while with the poor the usual accompaniments are too often ignorance, indifference and neglect, together with all of the other disadvantages that attend poverty. This fact has been established statistically wherever it has been investigated, and the studies, particularly of Flick in Philadelphia and later of Biggs in New York, have shown conclusively that there are certain districts in large cities and certain houses in those districts in which tuberculosis occurs for many years with almost uninterrupted continuity. An interesting inquiry on similar lines has recently been conducted by Professor Romberg and Dr. Gaedicke for the city of Marburg, and the results are

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