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Article
November 25, 1911

REPORT ON METHODS OF SCHOOL VENTILATION BY THE CHICAGO COMMISSION ON VENTILATION

Author Affiliations

Chicago Department of Health.; Chicago Board of Education.; Illinois Chapter, American Society of Heating and Ventilating Engineers.

JAMA. 1911;LVII(22):1757-1759. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.04260110257008
Abstract

In the publication called "Open-Air Crusaders," information is given as to three types of schools—open-air schools, coldroom schools and ordinary schools. It is well to bear in mind that these are three different types and that they are suited to three different types of children.

OPEN-AIR SCHOOLS  The open-air school is expensive to maintain. It is unnecessary except for a small group of children. Its field is the clinically tuberculous children, the distinctly subnormal children from a tuberculous environment, and a certain small percentage of distinctly subnormal children from non-tuberculous homes. It might be argued that children of this class are better off if they are not in school at all. There is an occasional child of whom this is true, but it is not true of the great mass of children of this group. The years of school are immensely valuable from both a pedagogic and a physical standpoint.

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