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Article
August 15, 1903

MEDICAL TEACHING AND MEDICAL RESEARCH AND THE INCREASING OPPORTUNITIES IN AMERICA TO ENTER ITS CAREER.

JAMA. 1903;XLI(7):428-429. doi:10.1001/jama.1903.04480040024011

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Abstract

This interesting subject is discussed briefly in the University Record of May, 1903. It is quite appropriate to continue the discussion in this, the educational, number of The Journal. The subject is of interest to every physician because it deals with questions that touch the vital center of medicine in this country; it is of interest to every medical student because he is concerned directly and personally with medical teaching, and, naturally, he must feel gratified if he learns that his opportunities to study medicine are better than those of his predecessors. The article in question points out that not so very long ago, indeed, only a few years ago, this country offered but one distinctly medical career to the student, namely, the practice of medicine in some form or other. It says:

Twenty years ago there was but an insignificant number of salaried medical professorships; assistants were not necessary

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