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Article
January 6, 1912

THE OCCURRENCE OF A POSITIVE WASSERMANN REACTION IN TWO CASES OF NON-SPECIFIC TUMOR OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(1):11-13. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260010013004
Abstract

So much experience has accumulated and has been published in attestation of the high diagnostic value of the Wassermann reaction that observations which seem in any measure to diminish that value should be dealt with circumspectly. It appears to have come to this: that, providing the performance of the test be not impugned, a positive Wassermann reaction is almost universally considered as imposing the obligation to find evidence of syphilis in the tissues or in the history, or, failing in this, nevertheless confidently to assume it. But cases will occur in which one cannot get rid of a sense of perplexity. Such are the two cases I am about to record. The first is sufficiently odd, apart from the discrepancy between what the Wassermann reaction indicated and what the autopsy disclosed. In both the interpretation will choose between an error somewhere in the complicated process of the test and the

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