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January 13, 1912

AN IDEAL ABDOMINAL INCISION FOR PELVIC SURGERY IN THE FEMALE

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(2):91-94. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260010093006
Abstract

In approaching the pelvic organs in the female for the purpose of surgical treatment, the incision used should possess numerous features advantageous alike to both operator and patient.

To overcome two great objections to the median-line incision—shock and postoperative hernia—the vaginal incision was devised and extensively practiced. This incision, while greatly minimizing the amount of shock and practically abolishing postoperative hernia, had the additional advantage of affording more direct access to the field of operation. It enjoyed well-deserved popularity, but that it had its limitations was soon evident. At the Second International Congress for Gynecology and Obstetrics, held at Geneva in 1896, Küstner presented a new method of opening the abdomen in place of the median-line incision. The cut was made in the region of the suprapubic hair in a transverso direction through the skin and subcuticular tissue; the fascia and peritoneum being incised vertically in the median line. He

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