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January 20, 1912

THREE OUTBREAKS OF TYPHOID FEVER TRACED TO MILK INFECTION

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(3):169-172. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260010171006

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Abstract

The outbreaks of typhoid fever here briefly described are put on record partly because of certain special features they present, partly because of our conviction that the frequency with which typhoid fever in this country is milk-borne needs to be more widely known.

I. LAGRANGE EPIDEMIC  This outbreak occurred in the autumn of 1899 in the village of LaGrange, a suburb of Chicago. A partial house-to-house canvass which we made under the auspices of the local board of health, together with information obtained by the aid of physicians, disclosed the existence of forty-five cases developing in the months of September, October, November and December, 1899. This was in the ratio of about one case to every ninety inhabitants, while in the adjoining city of Chicago during the same period the typhoid rate, as estimated from the number of deaths, was about 1 to 1,000. There was thus no doubt that

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