[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 12, 1903

SHOULD THE TUBERCULOUS PATIENT KNOW THE TRUTH REGARDING HIS CONDITION?

Author Affiliations

ASHEVILLE, N. C.

JAMA. 1903;XLI(11):656-657. doi:10.1001/jama.1903.92490300012001c
Abstract

All physicians who practice at health resorts frequented by patients suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis find that comparatively few of these patients have any conception of their real condition, and in the rarest instances have they been carefully instructed as to the necessities for recovery.

The profession generally seems to be of the opinion that tuberculous patients should not be told the nature of their trouble, but the average tuberculous patient generally finds out the true nature of his disease, and when he does he loses faith in his physicians, and frequently, very justly, will censure them for not telling him the truth.

How is it possible to get the coöperation of the patient; to have him use care in the disposal of expectoration; to avoid violence and over-exertion in exercise, and many other things so important in the detail management of the case, if

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×