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September 12, 1903

THE SIMILARITY OF SERUM COMPLEMENT AND THE DIGESTIVE ENZYMES.

JAMA. 1903;XLI(11):661-662. doi:10.1001/jama.1903.02490300017005
Abstract

While the action of complement has long been likened to that of a ferment, that it is such, or is the same as the ordinary enzymes with which we are familiar, has never been established. It is strikingly like the proteid dissolving enzymes, especially trypsin, in the following particulars: It dissolves proteid substances, such as the bodies of red cells, of bacteria, or for that matter any other sort of cells to which it may be attached by a suitable amboceptor; it is not entirely specific for different substances; it acts best in a medium with a certain degree of alkalinity; it is destroyed by a degree of heat quite comparable to that destroying enzymes. On the other hand, it has not yet been demonstrated that cell solution by serum leads to the production of the various digestion products of proteolysis by which trypsin or other proteases are characterized. The

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