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Article
March 16, 1912

THE JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(11):784-786. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260030182021
Abstract

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SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 1912

THE FATE OF ABSORBED PROTEINS  The immediate destiny of our food intake after it leaves the alimentary tract in the guise of a digestion product is a problem of supreme interest. Between the moment of absorption and the ultimate elimination of the effete waste of our sources of energy there is a gap of ignorance which is only slowly being filled by the accumulation of knowledge in the domain of intermediary metabolism. The physiologic chemist can follow the carbohydrates a little way as sugars to the liver and the fats along the thoracic duct into the general circulation. But the fate of the nitrogenous bodies has proved to be an almost impenetrable mystery. We are no longer content to speak learnedly

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