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Article
September 26, 1903

THE VARIOUS METHODS OF PRESERVING AND MOUNTING GROSS EYE PREPARATIONS.

JAMA. 1903;XLI(13):761-769. doi:10.1001/jama.1903.92490320001001
Abstract

Early methods of preserving the enucleated eyeball and other ocular tissues were very crude. The specimen was generally placed in a bottle of ethylic or methyl alcohol of unknown strength, which not only bleached and hardened the tissues, but rendered them useless for future microscopic sections. Shrinking of the globar walls and intraocular structures proceeded until the parts became unfit for use, either as museum preparations or for other teaching purposes. Attempts were now and then made, by the addition of glycerin and other agents to the alcohol, to retard these changes, but with little permanent success. Bichlorid solutions, Müller's fluid and other chromate preparations were found to be improvements on the alcohol mixtures, but even these were not satisfactory, requiring constant care and frequent changing of the fluid, else the tissues were not affected by stains subsequently used for microscopic sections. In any case the cornea became opaque, the iris discolored

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