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March 23, 1912

AN OPERATION FOR PROLAPSUS UTERIWITHOUT DISTURBANCE OF ANATOMIC RELATIONS AND WITHOUT THE NECESSITY FOR ABDOMINAL SECTION

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(12):846-847. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260030244006
Abstract

Turning the uterus upside down and fixing it in the vagina, hysterectomy, suspending the uterus high on the abdominal wall near the umbilicus, burying it in the muscles of the abdominal wall, injecting quinin or paraffin in the pelvic connective tissue, are examples of the bizarre and unanatomic procedures advocated and practiced at present for the attempted cure of prolapsus uteri. It is surprising that operations without the slightest relation to the causes of prolapse, or to the anatomy of the region, should be considered necessary.

For a number of years my clinical material in gynecology has been one of the largest, if not the largest, in a city of a million and a half population, aggregating about 4,000 women a year in the ambulatory dispensaries, outpatient service and ward patients.

It is apparent, therefore, to any one who knows what such patients are, that cases of prolapse of the

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