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Article
March 30, 1912

THE PRESENT STATUS OF PSYCHOLOGY IN MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PRACTICE

Author Affiliations

Scientific Director and Psychologist, Government Hospital for the Insane; Professor of Physiology, George Washington University WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(13):909-911. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260030307002
Abstract

Three or four decades ago a couple of courses in a medical school, followed or accompanied by visits to the patients of a practicing physician, sufficed to produce a doctor of medicine. At that time almost all that a medical school afforded was an opportunity for the work of dissection and a convenient place to take certain courses and see demonstrations in chemistry and materia medica. Other subjects were gradually introduced into the curriculum, until at the present time four years' study is required, approximating four thousand hours of didactic and laboratory instruction. The traditions of an anatomic character have, however, not entirely changed. Much attention has been and is now paid to studies involving the structure of the body, although, within the past few years, the requirements have been expanded in those, subjects which deal with function. It is a gratifying evidence of the advance of the functional standpoint

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