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Article
March 30, 1912

PSYCHOPATHOLOGY AND NEUROPATHOLOGY: THE PROBLEMS OF TEACHING AND RESEARCH CONTRASTED

Author Affiliations

Pathologist to the Massachusetts Board of Insanity CAMBRIDGE, MASS.

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(13):914-916. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260030312004
Abstract

The ideas that I wish to bring to this symposium are few, and I hope not too unorthodox. How shall research psychology and research medicine come together, on what ground, and to what ends? I wish (1) to insist strongly on the unique value of the pathologic method, not merely for the diagnostic and therapeutic purposes of medicine, but for biology as a whole and for the most vital of biologic sciences, psychology. I wish (2) to point out how pernicious in research may be the dogmatic insistence on the doctrine of psychophysical parallelism in medical or premedical courses in psychology—pernicious because it inhibits the free interchange of structural and functional concepts and the passage to and fro of workers in the several sciences. I wish (3) to show that psychology and physiology have more in common than either has with such structural sciences as anatomy and histology, and that

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