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Article
March 30, 1912

OBSERVATIONS ON THE OXYURIS VERMICULARIS, OR COMMON SEAT-WORM

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(13):931-932. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260030329012

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Abstract

Early one evening a male patient, complaining of itching about the anus, such as is common when seat-worms are present, received an enema of infusion of quassia chips, shortly thereafter expelling a portion of the fluid, which contained a fine specimen of Oxyuris vermicularis. This was washed and transferred to a drop of water on a microscopic slide, and examined under the microscope with a magnification of 75 diameters.

The worm, as a whole, presented no movement, but from almost one extremity to the other, with the exception of the awl-like pointed tail, contained, in its inner anatomy, a seething mass of eggs within a tubular structure that was in active state of contraction and expansion in various portions of its somewhat serpentine course.

This canal extended from the cephalic end of the worm to the caudal portion and back again, with numerous turns on itself on the way. One

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