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Article
October 17, 1896

WASHINGTON AND HIS PHYSICIAN'S BILL.

JAMA. 1896;XXVII(16):872. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430940042009

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Abstract

Physicians who are drawing pessimistic auguries from the difficulty with which collections are made during the present year, may take some comfort from the fact that, on the eve of the first election for President of the United States, the financial difficulty was such as to affect George Washington, the Father of his Country, the unanimous choice of his countrymen for President, in the payment of his physician, Dr. Craig. In a letter to the latter dated Aug. 4, 1788, Washington says:

"With this letter you will receive the horse I promised you, and which I now beg your acceptance of. He is not in such good order as I could wish, but as good as my means would place him. I also send you thirty pounds cash for one year's allowance for the schooling of your son G. W. I wish it was in my power to send the

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