[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.205.87.3. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 24, 1896

REPORT OF ONE HUNDRED CASES OF EXTRACTION OF HARD CATARACT.

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO, ILL.

JAMA. 1896;XXVII(17):885-889. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430950005002

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

It is not unusual for a surgeon, whether East or West, at home or abroad, to consider his special method of extraction of cataract superior to that of any other. Certainly, when one's cases are somewhat limited, it is infinitely better to become perfectly familiar with a special method and adhere to it as closely as possible, and whenever changes are made in order to accomplish some definite object, they should be gradual. The operation to be chosen should be the simplest and easiest of execution.

The loss of an eye means much to a patient, whether he be rich or poor. Relatively speaking, it is as unfortunate for an oculist to lose an eye as for a surgeon to lose a life. From Daniel's time to the present it has ever been sought to simplify the operation. I may be considered too conservative, but the results I have obtained

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×