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Article
October 24, 1896

ACUTE NON-SYPHILITIC CHOROIDITIS IN YOUNG ADULTS.

Author Affiliations

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF EYE AND EAR DISEASES, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE, MD.

JAMA. 1896;XXVII(17):889-891. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430950009002b

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Abstract

It has frequently been noted that of all eye structures the uvea is most apt to show systematic disease. The iritis, cyclitis and choroiditis of syphilis and rheumatism are matters of daily observation. The liability of the iris to become inflamed, in gouty subjects, after such slight trauma as simple cataract extraction, makes one chary in pressing operation upon such persons. The choroid is the favorite place for ocular tuberculosis. Metastatic infection from sepsis, typhus, typhoid and, more rarely, remittent fevers, from cerebro-spinal meningitis, most commonly appear in the choroid. Now and then one reads of functional disturbances in the iris or ciliary structures, attributed to digestive or sexual disorders. Again, it is from primary choroidal growths that metastasis is most apt to result. When one examines treatises upon diseases of the eye for the etiology of choroiditis, he finds comparatively little. As a rule, after a more or less

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