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Article
September 23, 1905

A PRELIMINARY REPORT ON CELLS FOUND IN YELLOW FEVER BLOOD, WITH REFERENCE TO THEIR ETIOLOGIC AND DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE.

Author Affiliations

NEW ORLEANS.

JAMA. 1905;XLV(13):915-917. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.52510130035001h

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Abstract

A careful study of yellow fever blood has shown the regular occurrence of certain cells hitherto either unnoticed or not described, which seem to be undergoing developmental changes and which can be demonstrated in the stomach of a recently infected-stegomyia. These cells are entirely extracellular, though occasionally some are seen lying on the red cells; on one occasion one was distinctly seen lying within the protoplasm of a polymorpho-neutrophilic leucocyte. They occur, as a rule, alone, though two or more may sometimes be noticed lying indefinitely grouped. They vary in size from twice the diameter of a pneumococcus to one-fourth the diameter of a red cell, and vary in shape from an ovoid to a sphere, and oft times come to a focus in a higher plane than the surrounding red cells. When stained they show, as a class, a highly granular neutrophilic protoplasm surrounding a nucleus which contains one

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