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Article
June 15, 1912

HOOKWORM AMONG ORIENTAL IMMIGRANTS

Author Affiliations

Passed Assistant Surgeon, United States Public Health and Marine-Hospital Service

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(24):1837-1840. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260060186003
Abstract

ANGEL ISLAND, CAL.  The Immigration Act regulating the admission of aliens into the United States provides for a medical examination to be conducted by officers of the Public Health and Marine-Hospital Service. The purpose of this examination is twofold: First, to prevent the introduction into this country of contagious disease of a dangerous or loathsome character, and, second, to weed out the physical or mental incompetents who are likely to become public charges.Recently attention was directed to the introduction of hookworm by aliens arriving at the port of San Francisco from the Orient. This infection has been classed among the dangerous contagious diseases whose admission is prohibited. A routine examination of the stools of the aliens passing through the immigration station on Angel Island was attempted. For many reasons it was neither possible nor advisable to examine all, but from Sept. 23, 1910, to Nov. 30,1911, the stools of

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