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Article
October 31, 1903

THE ROLE OF SODIUM CHLORID IN THE PRODUCTION AND TREATMENT OF EDEMA.

JAMA. 1903;XLI(18):1092-1093. doi:10.1001/jama.1903.02490370034003
Abstract

Always a puzzling problem to pathologists, the processes involved in the production of edema seem to have been in part clarified by progress in the application of physical chemistry both to theory and practice, and the results have been made to yield much of practical value in the hands of French and Italian clinicians. Several years ago Loeb urged the importance of osmotic disturbances in accounting for edema, as of more significance than the merely mechanical factors of increased vascular pressure. According to him, the chemical changes occurring in tissues with oxygen supply decreased through venous stagnation, accounted for far more of the extravasation of fluid into the tissues than did the increased filtration that might result from the heightened vascular pressure present in the capillaries in any passive congestion, no matter how severe. Under conditions of decreased oxidation the normal steps of metabolism are so interfered with that there

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