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Article
November 14, 1903

ARRESTED TUBERCULOSIS.SUBSEQUENT HISTORIES OF SEVENTY-NINE ARRESTED CASES TREATED AT THE SHARON SANITARIUM FROM 1891 TO 1902.

Author Affiliations

Medical Director, Sharon Sanitarium; Attending Physician, State Sanatorium, Rutland, Mass.; Consulting Physician, Boston City Hospital and New England Hospital for Women and Children. BOSTON.

JAMA. 1903;XLI(20):1203-1207. doi:10.1001/jama.1903.92490390027001h
Abstract

Four years ago I had the pleasure of giving the subsequent histories of thirty-four "arrested" cases of pulmonary disease treated at the Sharon Sanitarium from 1891 up to 1899.1 I will not apologize for bringing up the subject again, for all will agree that it is the after-histories of such cases which prove the efficacy or otherwise of methods which are now so prominently before the public.

Let me again cite the fact that these results have been obtained in a climate thought to be most unfavorable for consumptives, not far from the sea-coast and at the insignificant altitude of between 200 and 300 feet only above sea-level. In these latter particulars the Sharon Sanitarium was for several years unique. During recent years, Dr. Millet's sanatorium at East Bridgewater has been built with similar conditions, although it is intended for patients who are of a more well-to-do class than

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